2022 Writing Snippet #2

A periodic look at some of the passages and lines I’m most proud of. For this one, a couple paragraphs from the forthcoming Prelude to Hellion. This is another one I get pretty chuffed over every time I read it.

[President] Crawford helped Pearson into a sitting position as the generals and other advisers slowly filed out of the Situation Room. Shrugged shoulders and arched eyebrows trailed them out the door, and Donaldson hung behind, too busy wiping at his face with a handkerchief to notice anything else. The sight of red on the otherwise pristine cloth made his heart skip a beat before he pushed his way out of the room.

“What was all that?” Pearson asked.

Crawford shook her head, stealing a quick glance at the ceiling fan. Which was no longer spinning. “Let’s just say this task force is even more necessary than we thought. And it might not be a bad idea to add a mystic or two to my Secret Service detail.”

Pearson’s brows shot skyward. “I think I have the Winchesters on speed dial.”

For the first time since Election Day, Crawford let loose a genuine, full-throated laugh.

Writing Snippet #1

2022 Writing Snippet #1

Not the final cover.

A periodic look at some of the passages and lines I’m most proud of. For this one, a couple paragraphs from the forthcoming Summertime, Assassins, and Other Skullduggeries. Not gonna lie, I’m pretty proud of this one.

It wasn’t long before the hotel in question came into view. The Hilton Midtown, a hotel that stretched for the sky and had undoubtedly hosted many a high-class affair over the years. There was no telling how many companies and organizations around the world had booked this hotel for their meetings and conferences and black-tie dinners—whatever excuse to visit New York City, get dressed up for a night, and pretend they were more important than they really were.

That was another thing this city was good at: making people think they were better, smarter, more consequential than they actually were. How else could a failed real estate tycoon with multiple bankruptcies on his resume end up in the White House?

Here Comes 2022!

Whether we’re ready or not, 2022 is here.

But let’s be real: most of us were ready to leave 2021 behind. Even though in some ways, 2022 doesn’t seem all that different (at least not yet).

But in different, more personal ways, 2022 is already a near-total shift from the previous year. My day job is in the midst of a transition phase—which, I assure you all, is a good thing. But it’s still a transition and it’s still an adjustment.

More than anything, though, I’m looking for 2022 to be the year I finally get back in my creative groove. I want to put the struggles of the past couple years (at the very least) behind me and get back to actually starting, progressing, and finishing my projects. Because I have quite a few projects, and I’m convinced a large part of my troubles as an author stem from the relative lack of content over the past few years.

Between June 2015 (when Bounty came out) and October 2017 (when I hit Publish on Notna), I published five novels and a novella. Since Notna? One novel and one non-fiction book.

The well, as they say, done gone dry.

It’s certainly not for a lack of ideas. There are plenty of those. Just…for a variety of reasons, the words have been hard to come by in recent years, and everything has sort of snowballed because of that. But 2022 is the year that changes.

I can’t promise I’ll actually publish anything in 2022 (because setting such dates so far in advance doesn’t work for me, and it’s time I stop doing things that don’t work). But 2022 will be the year I finish what I start, I push through what’s already in-progress, and work on being a more active, more supportive member of the writing community.

That means more reading and more writing.

That means practicing what I preached in The Art of Reading.

That means finishing Edge of the Breach by Halo Scot and Vicious by V.E. Schwab and then tackling the other books I’m (allegedly) in the middle of reading.

That means not just supporting the indie authors I already support, but finding new indie authors to get behind.

That means supporting other indie creators, be they painters or comic artists or musicians.

That means wrapping up Bitter End (Jill Andersen #6).

That means launching the Hellion series.

That means finishing the Summertime, Assassins, and Other Skullduggeries trilogy…duology…book thingy. You know, however many books it takes to tell what’s probably the closest I’ll ever get to telling a true love story.

That means committing more to short stories, both for anthology consideration and simply to continue flexing my creative muscles.

That means investing in my talent (and understanding that not all investments are monetary).

That means cutting back on the distractions.

That means sitting my pasty ass down in front of my laptop and making my fingers dance over the keys.

That means committing to consistently giving this page and Medium the kind of content my followers want – not just creative stuff, but general musings. I want you all to get to know me for all of me, not just the writer monkey who pecks at the keyboard.

That means all the coffee and all the hot tea and all the…chicken wings?

Yeah, all the chicken wings. Expanding waistline be damned.

Consider this your official invitation, dear reader, to join me on the creative journey that will be 2022. Though I’m still very much a hermit, I find this journey is more fun when there are people to bring along the way. There is a time and a place for taking the walk yourself, but ultimately, the support and the cheerleading of others truly makes this all worthwhile.

Currently, my sales chart tells me I’m alone in this. I’d like to think that’s not the case.

This is not a plea to buy my entire catalog in one go (though I’m certainly not gonna argue if you decide to do just that). It’s more a concerted effort on my part to stop closing myself off from everything and everyone. I’m not promising to be a social butterfly (I very much am not and never have been one of those), but the hermit life hasn’t been nearly as fulfilling.

As an author or overall.

So let 2022 be the year J.D. Got His (Writing) Groove Back (yeah, I reached a bit for that reference). No grand pronouncements, no promises I probably can’t keep. Just a commitment to churn out words to the best of my ability and fully immerse myself in the beauty that is human creativity – because it’s truly the one thing that sets us apart in this messed-up world.

I’m a writer. I’m a creator. And dammit, it’s time I started acting like it again.

Wanna join me?

About J.D. Cunegan
J.D. Cunegan is known for his unique writing style, a mixture of murder mystery and superhero epic that introduces the reader to his comic book-inspired storytelling and fast-paced prose. A 2006 graduate of Old Dominion University, Cunegan has an extensive background in journalism, a lengthy career in media relations, and a lifelong love for writing. Cunegan lives in Hampton, Virginia, and next to books and art, his big passion in life in auto racing. When not hunched in front of a keyboard or with his nose stuck in a book, Cunegan can probably be found at a race track or watching a race on TV.

Follow J.D. on FacebookTwitter, and Goodreads.

Just Who *is* J.D. Cunegan, Anyway?

Author’s Note: This piece originally appeared on Medium.

After 40 years, I think I’ve finally figured it out.

Hey, look! I have books!

Mostly.

I’m a self-published author. I’m a motorsports junkie. I’m a relatively new hockey fan and a lifelong baseball nut. My hockey team won the Stanley Cup in 2018 and my baseball team doesn’t look like it’s winning anything any time soon.

Pre-plague, I went to roughly five NASCAR races a year. Every weekend, there are fast cars on my TV. NASCAR, IndyCar, Formula 1, NHRA, IMSA sports cars. If it goes fast and has four wheels, chances are I have at least a passing interest.

Heh, passing. Get it?

…Get it?

Okay, I’ll stop.

I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was in middle school, when I first discovered the X-Men and then had designs on being the next Jim Lee. The next Todd MacFarlane. But once I got to college, I discovered I was a much better writer than artist. Mostly because majoring in art in college is a surefire way to fall out of love with art.

(Pro tip: if you wanna study art in college, go to an actual art school.)

But I also discovered sports writing. And sportscasting. I spent the latter half of my college days working for the campus newspaper and campus radio station, writing columns and laying out pages and calling basketball and baseball games on the radio (Old Dominion didn’t yet have football when I was there).

So now my day job involves working in college athletics. Writing press releases and handling media inquiries and doing what often feels like entirely too much. I’ve seen my share of NCAA Tournament games and spent more time on buses and planes than I care to admit. But I have a decent ring collection and the pay’s good; it’s helped finance my other writing.

You know, those books I’ve written?

I published my debut novel, Bounty, on June 1, 2015. As of this writing, I have six novels, a short story collection, a non-fiction book, and three anthology contributions to my name. My flagship work is the Jill Andersen series, a comic book-inspired mash-up of the murder mystery and superhero genres, and I’ve also written Notna, which I have trouble categorizing other than to quote a review I got, which said it was like “a cross between Indiana Jones and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.”

I have several other novels in the works (including the next Jill Andersen installment and a brand new series), and if all things go as they should, 2022 should be a pretty big year creatively speaking for me. I can’t promise anything will actually release in 2022, but if I can finish the books I have in-progress, that will go a long way to getting me back on track.

Maybe I can also finally get to a track again in 2022. But knowing COVID the way I do (and those who still refuse to take it seriously), probably not.

Which sucks, because I haven’t been to a race since October 2019. I miss it.

I enjoy (most of) the MCU movies. I’m terrible at watching and keeping up with TV shows (seriously; I didn’t watch Buffy until it was already off the air, and most of my favorite TV shows are no longer running).

I’m an avid reader, because I can’t imagine being a writer and not reading. I firmly believe you need to be one to be the other — so much so, that’s the subject of my non-fiction book (The Art of Reading). I have a handful of authors whose work I love almost without reservation — Chuck Wendig, R.R. Virdi, S.E. Anderson, Sabaa Tahir — and I’m a big supporter of indie and self-published authors.

Because since becoming an author myself nearly seven years ago, the vast majority of the books I’ve loved the most have come from indie and self-published authors.

If you were to visit me, you’d find three things in abundance: books, superhero statues and figures, and race car diecast models (and other racing paraphernalia). That’s probably the greatest summary of who I am and what makes me tic.

Mostly because I can’t just leave chicken wings sitting around. For one thing, they’d go bad if I did that, which would be a terrible waste. Not to mention the bugs they’d likely attract.

I’m the kind of person who stays in during the weekend and enjoys the quiet of solitude (even before COVID became a thing). I’m not a particularly social person, I’ve never been one for the bar scene, and frankly, almost all my friends live elsewhere. I’m as happy on a Friday night in bed with a beer and a book as I am with just about anything else.

I have stories to keep me company, and the older I get (how the hell am I 40?!), the more I find that’s okay.

Unless you have wings. Or you buy one of my books. Then we can talk.

About J.D. Cunegan
J.D. Cunegan is known for his unique writing style, a mixture of murder mystery and superhero epic that introduces the reader to his comic book-inspired storytelling and fast-paced prose. A 2006 graduate of Old Dominion University, Cunegan has an extensive background in journalism, a lengthy career in media relations, and a lifelong love for writing. Cunegan lives in Hampton, Virginia, and next to books and art, his big passion in life in auto racing. When not hunched in front of a keyboard or with his nose stuck in a book, Cunegan can probably be found at a race track or watching a race on TV.

Follow J.D. on FacebookTwitter, and Goodreads.

Book Reviews XIV

Consistent Creative Content: A Guide to Authoring and Blogging in the Social Media Age by Lee Hall

I honestly believe every indie author needs this book on their shelf.

I’ve made no secret on several different platforms my creative problems of late. The reasons for this struggle are numerous, but at least through Consistent Creative Content, I now have a road map for getting back on the proverbial horse. At the height of my writing powers, I was publishing two novels a year and averaging a blog post a week — and it’s no coincidence that numbers, meager though they were, were much better than they are now.

Lee Hall’s brief how-to not only offers a road map; it’s also inspiration (for things I can do going forward) and validation (that, in some ways, I was on the right track when I was at my best and most productive). I also appreciate that Hall didn’t just tell us how to promote our work — he also offered concrete examples of promotions he had run, and the results therein.

I still have a long creative road ahead (and patience is not one of my virtues), but Hall’s Consistent Creative Content is another example of a book I needed, right when I needed it. This is the sort of book I wish had existed when I first published Bounty back in 2015, but I’m glad to have it now.

Indie authors of any stripe — whether they’ve never published before or they have a backlog dozens of books deep — would do well to have a copy of this book. There really is something in here for everybody, and if 2022 winds up being my creative resurgence, this book will be a big reason why.

Rating: *****

Consistent Creative Content is available in paperback and Kindle.

The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu by Tom Lin

A book I bought solely based on the blurb, The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu wound up being a much more languid, slower-paced read than I expected — and that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Make no mistake: this book is every bit as violent as promised. It is brutal, frank, and visceral, yet Tom Lin’s prose reads like that of a more practiced author, not someone who’s graced our bookshelves for the first time. His style has a cadence and a flow to it, almost like he’s dancing with the words on the page.

That rhythm pairs nicely with the blood. It’s even better when things slow down.

As brutal as Thousand Crimes is– a brutality reflecting an America not only then, but an America now in a lot of ways — this book is also ponderous. Almost philosophical at times. As is sometimes the case, though, the protagonist is the least interesting character of the whole lot, and much of the fun comes not in Ming making progress in his mission, but the way the characters in orbit interact — if not with him, then with each other.

There’s also the matter of an abrupt ending — so abrupt, it almost feels like it snuck up on the author, too. It’s an ending with finality, if not a satisfactory one, and for a book that truly felt like a journey, the proverbial brakes screeching was slightly disorienting.

Still, Lin has penned a magnificent debut. A deft, beautifully written tale of love, loss, hate, betrayal, and blood. Lots and lots of blood.

Rating: ****

The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu is available in hardcover, paperback, audiobook, and Kindle.

The Book of Accidents by Chuck Wendig

Chuck Wendig’s latest, The Book of Accidents, is a horror novel. As such, it is equal parts disturbing, unnerving, and, to some degree, terrifying.

It is also surprisingly touching.

I will admit to some ignorance when it comes to the horror genre – whether in print or on screen, it’s not a genre I’m familiar with or interested in – but Wendig is one of those authors whose work I’ll support regardless, so I was eager to get my hands on The Book of Accidents. And what I found was a lot of heart – much more than I expected – beyond the mind trips and the blood and the general aura of “what the ever-loving f***?!”

Because if there’s one thing Wendig is particularly good at, it’s the “what the ever-loving f***?!” Whether it’s this book or Wanderers (to date, his best work) or the Miriam Black novels or even, to an extent, Damn Fine Story, Wendig makes a habit of having you asking yourself WTF, even as you continue to flip the pages.

Pacing is this book’s biggest sin, but only occasionally, though I admit that’s a by-product of me being emotionally invested in certain characters more than others. Wendig’s command of the written word is as strong as ever, and he takes great pains in making sure you care about who you’re supposed to care about – otherwise, none of the scary stuff would matter.

If you like the genre, this is probably already on your shelf. If it’s not, it really should be.

Even if it ends up being too disturbing to pick up again.

Rating: ****

The Book of Accidents is available in hardcover, audiobook, and Kindle.

A Guide to Selling Books on Social Media

Lee's Hall of information

Writing and publishing a book is an incredible achievement and then comes the daunting task of actually selling it to readers. The truth is, that part is really hard sometimes and finding ways to sell online and through social media really is a challenge.

Marketing is often dismissed by authors because they tend to think they are no good at it and that’s okay. For many years I thought I was terrible at cooking until I followed a coherent and simple recipe to realise with some practice and effort, cooking isn’t that hard. The same can be said about book marketing. With some perspective and a little consistency, selling books online is possible and even fun. I’m someone who regularly sells their books through social media and I’m going to share with you my lessons and observations that will hopefully help you.

We will look in detail at using social…

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Happy New Year!

Expect this sight a lot in 2022. I hope.

May 2022 bring everything you want and hope. Look for a lot more out of this page in the coming year — and beyond.

Happy writing! Happy reading!

About J.D. Cunegan
J.D. Cunegan is known for his unique writing style, a mixture of murder mystery and superhero epic that introduces the reader to his comic book-inspired storytelling and fast-paced prose. A 2006 graduate of Old Dominion University, Cunegan has an extensive background in journalism, a lengthy career in media relations, and a lifelong love for writing. Cunegan lives in Hampton, Virginia, and next to books and art, his big passion in life in auto racing. When not hunched in front of a keyboard or with his nose stuck in a book, Cunegan can probably be found at a race track or watching a race on TV.

Follow J.D. on FacebookTwitter, and Goodreads.

The Best Books I Read in 2021

I had high hopes for 2021. Then it reminded me why I’m a natural pessimist.

But 2021 did give me another crop of really good, really strong books to read. So while I didn’t accomplish much writing-wise these past 365 days (or really much of anything other than “don’t get the plague”), I can at least look back at my bookshelf and realize I was thoroughly entertained, enlightened, and educated.

NOTE: These are not necessarily the best books that came out in 2021, just the best books I read throughout the past calendar year.

5. Ever the Hero by Darby Harn

If you need a reason why the superhero genre is exploding, books like Ever the Hero are why.

Darby Harn gives us a mash-up of superheroes and science fiction (and a pleasantly surprising amount of political reality). For a story about aliens and spaceships and glowing, flying superheroes, Ever the Hero is remarkably grounded. This is where the relatively slow-paced opening half is so critical (if only in hindsight), showing us who protagonist Kit is, what makes her her.

We love all the best superheroes because of who they are beyond their splash page-worthy heroics. We can’t love Superman if we don’t love Clark Kent, and Harn gets that. For all Kit’s many strengths once she has powers, it’s who she is independent of those abilities that makes her so easy to root for and invest in.

This book is equal parts epic and tragic and frustrating in how plausible and realistic certain parts of it are. It’s the very best of a rapidly growing genre, and the perfect foundation for what promises to be a fantastic, engrossing series.

Ever the Hero is available in paperback and Kindle.

4. Inalienable by S.E. Anderson

Inalienable is the seventh entry in S.E. Anderson’s quirky, irreverent sci-fi series, and it’s every bit as funny and intense and fresh as the six books that came before it. Such liveliness this deep into a series is a rarity, yet Anderson manages to bring something new with each book while still keeping the themes and the humor that have become her hallmark.

The core trio of Sally, Zander, and Blayde manage the delicate balance of staying true to themselves while still growing, and the humor infused in their never-ending hijinks helps keep every installment fresh. In fact, we’re as out of our element in this book as Sally is, and that works to the narrative’s benefit.

Each book in the series offers something different, a taste of a different genre aside from the science fiction that rests at the foundation. Inalienable is no different, as it takes on a space opera feel to it—this book is certainly not as grounded as its predecessor.

But that works to keep the series fresh. Sally and her pals never know what’s coming, and neither do we. Anderson is to be lauded for her ability to keep this series as lively and interesting seven books in as it was when that hot air balloon first crash-landed into Sally’s window.

Inalienable is available in paperback and Kindle.

3. How the Word in Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America by Clint Smith

Given the racial reckoning that’s taken over America since George Floyd’s murder, books like Clint Smith’s How the Word is Passed have seen a surge in interest. To be frank, though, the content of Smith’s book should be rendered moot by the subject matter having been taught in our history classes.

But the American education system’s failure of choice means Smith has to start candid, important, and uncomfortable conversations – conversations too many of us are still refusing to have. Almost every issue facing America can be traced, in one way or another, to our racist history (and present), and our collective refusal to acknowledge that leaves us…

Well, here.

As mentioned, How the Word is Passed is uncomfortable at times – both in predictable and unexpected ways. I was particularly struck by one chapter in which Smith takes a tour of a prison in Louisiana, because I cannot wrap my head around the concept of a prison giving tours to the public. Yet one more offshoot of how America continues to have – and ignore – a race problem.

This is a book everyone needs to read. Especially white people.

How the Word is Passed is available in hardcover, audiobook, and Kindle.

2. A Sky Beyond the Storm by Sabaa Tahir

An emotionally satisfying ending is not necessarily a happy ending.

Sabaa Tahir’s A Sky Beyond the Storm, the finale in the Ember series, taught me that lesson. While the conclusion was every bit as violent and intense as expected, it was also the kind of ending that satisfied, even if the conclusion was (perhaps in hindsight) inevitable and far from what anyone would consider happy.

Because it made sense for the characters.

Through four books, and through possibly just as many points of view, Tahir never once lost sight of her characters. Through each book, Laia, Elias, and Helene were at the center of every twist, every shocking reveal, every tragedy. Tahir’s almost obsessive reliance on her characters above all else made for an emotionally tense and visceral tale.

And whereas many a series stumbles on the dismount, Tahir suffers no such fate with Sky, because of her insistent need to center the characters. Tahir’s series is a masterclass in not just fantasy storytelling or the practice of telling a story through multiple POVs, but also in the importance of character over plot.

Tahir’s masterstroke of a finale proves that characters are what make us fall in love with stories.

A Sky Beyond the Storm is available in hardcover, audiobook, and Kindle.

1. A Country of Eternal Light by Darby Harn

Harn pulls no punches in his magnum opus, a spec-fic classic that feels less like spec fic and more like a thorough examination of the human condition. Specifically, what do human beings do when stripped of all hope, of all optimism?

It turns out, they…keep on living.

If that sounds cheery…it’s not. Harn makes A Country of Eternal Light a difficult read—not because he lacks narrative skill or understanding of what makes great characters (he certainly possesses both qualities in spades), but because he forces the reader to examine, to experience, to feel everything his characters feel. There is no hiding in this book. Not for the characters, and not for us.

And yet, the pages keep turning. There is no last-minute save. Harn does not concoct some plot device to wave away the despair that lies at the core of this book. We have to sit with the woe and the death and the hopelessness as much as the characters do. This book is the human experience, stripped to its hopeless yet stubborn core.

It’s a modern masterpiece that will break you several different ways.

A Country of Eternal Light is available in paperback and Kindle.

Honorable Mention: Consistent Creative Content: A Guide to Authoring and Blogging in the Social Media Age by Lee Hall, How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi, Bag Man by Rachel Maddow and Michael Yarvitz, Codename Villanelle by Luke Jennings, The Book of Accidents by Chuck Wendig, The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu by Tom Lin, A Promised Land by Barack Obama, Deferred Glory: Heroes of the Negro Baseball Leagues by Danny A. Ingellis, The Cormorant by Chuck Wendig, The Storyteller: Tales of Life and Music by Dave Grohl, War Girls by Tochi Onyebuchi.

About J.D. Cunegan
J.D. Cunegan is known for his unique writing style, a mixture of murder mystery and superhero epic that introduces the reader to his comic book-inspired storytelling and fast-paced prose. A 2006 graduate of Old Dominion University, Cunegan has an extensive background in journalism, a lengthy career in media relations, and a lifelong love for writing. Cunegan lives in Hampton, Virginia, and next to books and art, his big passion in life in auto racing. When not hunched in front of a keyboard or with his nose stuck in a book, Cunegan can probably be found at a race track or watching a race on TV.

Follow J.D. on FacebookTwitter, and Goodreads.

The Best Books I Have Read in 2021

Lee's Hall of information

As the year draws to a close I have saved the best until last. Although I appreciate every author and their wonderful works that got me through 2021 this post is dedicated to the books that stood out to me.

‘From Voiceless to Vocal’ by Danielle Larsen

Having read this memoir all the way back in February it has remained with me since for being a brave, candid and incredibly well written account by Danielle Larsen. Mental health and escaping abuse are the central themes while also being subjects that might not be talked about as much as they should – this book isn’t afraid to go there with the path it carves in order to get that point across. Its ultimately inspiring and gives hope even to those who seemingly have so much stacked against them.

Quote from my review:no matter how many chips are down you…

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BOOK REVIEW: The Storyteller

I don’t typically review memoirs, simply because for the most part, I don’t see the point in it. If it’s about someone you like, chances are you’ll like the book. And if you don’t like the person the memoir’s about…well, then you’re probably not even going to read it.

And honestly, I picked up The Storyteller at the airport just so I could have something to pass the time while I was being hurtled in the air toward…I don’t even remember where I was going at this point. But, with all due respect to Dave Grohl (he of Nirvana and Foo Fighters fame), his memoir was supposed to be little more than a throwaway read.

Little did I realize this was the exact book I needed, right when I needed it.

Unlike Grohl, I don’t have a musical bone in my body. I enjoy music, but I can’t create it. But one thing Grohl and I have in common is this deep, existential need to create. Whereas his canvas is a drum kit or a recording studio, mine is the word processor. Everything music is to Grohl, writing is for me. Only I had lost sight of that of late.

Taking this journey with Grohl, from his suburban Virginia childhood all the way through the whirlwind of rock stardom, tragedy, and eventual fatherhood, served as a stark reminder–not just about the importance of not denying your truth, but the value of courage, of taking that chance that frightens you, of looking at the world and deciding you’re going to do the thing you do, regardless of what anyone else says or thinks.

“Courage is a defining actor in the life of any artist,” Grohl writes in one of the book’s most poignant passages. And while he speaks specifically of music–his art form of choice–the same truths can be applied to any creative discipline.

At the end of the day, my own creative struggles are indicative of a lack of courage. The Storyteller, without Grohl even realizing it, has gotten me back on the path to my own creative freedom. Finding my courage again: courage to tell my stories, to tell them loudly, and to tell people about them once they’re out in the world.

There is a charmed-life aspect to Grohl’s memoir; more than once, he happens to be at the right place and the right time, and more than once, I flipped the pages with a dopey, “Wait-you-know-so-and-so?” grin on my face. But even those instances boil down to Grohl’s creative urges and his courage and follow them.

Which is why The Storyteller is a book I’m glad I read. It came about just when I needed it most.

The Storyteller is available in ebook, hardcover, and audiobook.