The Interference of Real Life

One of the most annoying things a creative can deal with is when real life butts in and takes over.

That’s where I’m at right now.

My grandfather on my mother’s side passed away last night. He was 88. He was also a two-time heart attack survivor, a stroke survivor, a diabetic, an Army vet, an avid golfer, and a far more complicated man than most wanted to admit. He loved me and treated me as well as he knew how, but he also loved using the N word and ordering my grandmother around.

He had been in the hospital twice over the past month for various ailments, but he seemed to have been on the mend before we got that fateful call (in the closing laps of the NASCAR race at Bristol). It’s both a shock and not surprising at all, and I find the entire coming week upended. In the grief of losing a loved one, I find myself trying to square things away at my job before hitting the road.

All things considered, I’m lucky that I still have grandparents in my life at age 41. But that age also brings with it the sobering realization that my body is not what it once was; specifically, the fact that my 41st birthday brought with it a diabetes diagnosis (just what I always wanted…). The physical symptoms I began exhibiting over the summer, that had sapped me of my focus and creative energy, turned out to be exactly what I thought they were.

So now much of my non-work time is spent dealing with doctors who are urgent for me to do something now (even to the point where they prescribed medication I didn’t want without consulting with me first), a pharmacy that takes its sweet time filling the prescriptions I do want, and health insurance that doesn’t pay quite as much as it should for everything.

This is the part of adulting I could do without.

The only good thing going in my life right now–aside from the fact that I’m still alive and feeling physically fine, even if my doctor’s freaking the fuck out–is a potential romantic relationship that came to me out of nowhere. I’ll refrain from details here (because some of them are too messed up to believe), but suffice it to say…I need life to chill a little bit.

I’m still working to get Bitter End out before the end of the year (though some help from my editor on that would be nice), and I’d like to get back to Summertime‘s manuscript. I just…I need things to stop. I need a break.

I need to not adult for a few months.

About J.D. Cunegan
J.D. Cunegan is known for his unique writing style, a mixture of murder mystery and superhero epic that introduces the reader to his comic book-inspired storytelling and fast-paced prose. A 2006 graduate of Old Dominion University, Cunegan has an extensive background in journalism, a lengthy career in media relations, and a lifelong love for writing. Cunegan lives in Hampton, Virginia, and next to books and art, his big passion in life in auto racing. When not hunched in front of a keyboard or with his nose stuck in a book, Cunegan can probably be found at a race track or watching a race on TV.

Follow J.D. on FacebookTwitter, and Goodreads.

July 2022: Month in Review

There isn’t much to review, because I didn’t do much in July other than work and try to survive.

No, really.

There’s something I’m dealing with health-wise that is sapping both my energy and my ability to focus. I have an appointment set up to look into it, but I can’t help but feel how inconvenient this is. Like, I’m too busy for this nonsense. I have shit to do. I can’t be getting sick.

I have a feeling I know what it is, and it’s scary in a way, but again: there is too much shit to do. I don’t have time for this. Just because I’m 40 now, that doesn’t mean my body can start acting like a car once the warranty’s expired.

Stop it, body. I have things to do.

And when I say I can’t focus…I haven’t written a word in weeks, and I haven’t read anything in almost as long. There’s just nothing there, and I’m afraid there won’t be until I get some answers on this other thing that’s bothering me.

Sometimes, I hate this whole being human thing.

Reading
One book I did manage to read was Iron Widow by Xirna Jay Zhao. I don’t yet have it in me to write a full review (see above about the whole focus thing), but it’s a fantastic tale of righteous rage and using that rage to dismantle systems that don’t deserve to exist. Oh, and it takes one of my all-time least favorite tropes — love triangles — and turns it on its head. Everyone needs this book on their shelf.

On Sale
July saw Smashwords hold its annual Summer/Winter Sale, in which every book enrolled was available for 50% off. Did you take advantage?

You Like Free Stuff, Don’t You?
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Consider This My Pride Month Post

Far be it for me to be all “buy stuff!” during Pride Month. Because there are far too many companies out there who just make their logo all rainbow-fied on June 1 and pander their asses off to get the less straight among us to part with our money.

Rainbows: they exist year-round.

(I mean, how else do you explain this?)

But then I remembered…duh, I’m LBGT myself! I oscillate between bisexual and pansexual, and there are times when I consider myself asexual as well (because sexuality is fluid and frustrating and occasionally stupid)…to say nothing of all the LGBT representation I have in my books. So, if I can’t hawk my wares during Pride Month, when can I?

Below is a breakdown of the LGBT rep in my books (both my current library and one of my WIPs). Note that for the most part, I don’t write LGBT stories (as in, my characters’ queerness is not the story itself). Those stories are important and have a place, but it’s also important to write stories in which LGBT characters simply exist. Because that reflects real life. LGBT people exist.

Anywho…

Jill Andersen Series
My police procedural/superhero series features multiple LGBT characters, starting with protagonist Jill Andersen. The war veteran/homicide cop/superhero is also decidedly ace, and I make that point explicitly clear on multiple occasions (because representation doesn’t count if it’s simply hinted at or thrown in after the fact–right, JK?).

There is also M/M romance in the series, between Ramon and Jorge; they’re engaged when the series starts, and in Behind the Mask (book four), they get married. I’ll never be confused for the romantic sort, but it’s important to show queer relationships that just…exist. See two paragraphs up for a refresher.

In Behind the Mask (book three), I introduced Mitch, an open trans woman. I won’t say too much more here, because that would venture into spoiler territory, but rest assured that Mitch has a huge role in Bitter End (book six, coming soon), where her story undergoes a massive shift.

Notna
Dr. Jack Corbett, the protagonist of Notna (or…co-protagonist, depending on your point of view), is a bisexual Black man. Though his sexuality has no bearing on the story, and his bisexuality is only referenced once in a humorous way, I felt it important that there be a bi male presence, particularly one who isn’t white. Because too often, bi means white and female and cis (it seems like to some, a character’s queerness is only viewed through the lens of a heterosexual man’s lustful gaze…but that’s a different essay for a different day).

Also…yes, Jack is in a romantic relationship with a cis woman. He’s still bi.

Summertime, Assassins, and Other Skullduggeries (in-progress)
The closest thing I’ll probably ever write to a true love story, protagonist Summer Rhoades and sometimes-antagonist Lola Haskins are assassins. And lesbians. And former lovers. In fact, the last time they saw each other, it was at gunpoint and there’s a ton of angst there. But in a way, things develop into a will-they-or-won’t-they-(again) kind of back-and-forth as the book progresses and as Summer tries to keep from dying.

And hey, if you like HEAs (Happily Ever After, for the uninitiated)…this might be your book. Because I typically don’t do HEAs. But for this book, I’ll make an exception. Because honestly, aren’t we all tired of seeing queer romance that ends with one person dead? Especially if they’re lesbians?

(Glaring at you, The 100 and Atomic Blonde and too many other examples to count…)

About J.D. Cunegan
J.D. Cunegan is known for his unique writing style, a mixture of murder mystery and superhero epic that introduces the reader to his comic book-inspired storytelling and fast-paced prose. A 2006 graduate of Old Dominion University, Cunegan has an extensive background in journalism, a lengthy career in media relations, and a lifelong love for writing. Cunegan lives in Hampton, Virginia, and next to books and art, his big passion in life in auto racing. When not hunched in front of a keyboard or with his nose stuck in a book, Cunegan can probably be found at a race track or watching a race on TV.

Follow J.D. on FacebookTwitter, and Goodreads.

2022 Writing Snippet #6

A periodic look at some of the passages and lines I’m most proud of. For this one, a passage from my current WIP Summertime, Assassins, and Other Skullduggeries.

“Shit!”

Summer looked up with her eyes as wide as they’d ever been, her heart leaping up into her throat. “Shit? Lola, what do you mean…’shit?’”

Yanking the ski mask off her head, her curly purple locks springing free, Lola bit her lower lip as she began the laborious process of taking apart her sniper rile. It was a process Summer had seen several times over the past week, but she still couldn’t pull it off herself. “I missed.”

Summer blinked. “I’m sorry, what did you just say? Because it sounds like you said you missed.”

“Because I did!”

Summer watched as pieces of the sniper rifle came apart, like some bastardized form of Legos for bloodthirsty adults. The scope and barrel were one piece, until they weren’t, and then they disappeared in separate compartments of Lola’s black duffel bag. There were pockets inside pockets on that thing, so it appeared to hold more than it should. Like some magic fantasy bag or something.

“You told me yesterday you don’t miss!”

“Yeah, well,” Lola huffed, yanking a zipper shut before pulling off the shoulder stump and tossing into the opposite end of the bag, “I do when the wind gusts just as I pull the trigger.”

Writing Snippet #1 | Writing Snippet #2 Writing Snippet #3 | Writing Snippet #4
Writing Snippet #5

Book Reviews XVII

The Heartbeat of a Million Dreams by Halo Scot

Halo Scot has quickly become one of my favorite authors, known for deeply intense stories featuring co-protagonists who are as equal as they are opposites, and for all the fireworks and the bloodshed and the lust, these stories have a heart and an earnestness about them that shines through.

The Heartbeat of a Million Dreams is no different. Though not nearly as disturbing as Scot’s Rift Cycle series can be at times (though this story is by no means short on the violence and the bloodshed), hallmarks of Scot’s writing are evident. Fortunately, they are all the best parts.

Slade is, for lack of a better word, the Chosen One. The only one who can fix the dystopian madness, and Koa begins as the person responsible for making sure Slade realizes her destiny. It’s much more complex than that, but that’s the spoiler-free gist–and it’s the backdrop for neurodivergent representation and LGBT representation and, most importantly, memorable, dynamic, and emotionally available characters.

More than anything, though, Heartbeat is the purest distillation of Scot’s writing. It’s urgent, intense. In your face. Scot has a lot of things to say, and they need to be said right fucking now, dammit and that urge, that necessity of message, is present in everything Scot writes.

That urgency, that intensity, is addictive, and it’s why the pages so often fly by. The Heartbeat of a Million Dreams is Scot’s best work, even if it’s not quite the mind-fuck one might expect. This is a must-read, another classic from Scot’s library, and anyone with even the faintest interest in spec fic or superheroes or Chosen Ones should not miss this classic.

Rating: *****

The Heartbeat of a Million Dreams is available in paperback and Kindle

Dreadknot by S.E. Anderson

The thing about comedies…every now and then, they punch you in the gut.

Dreadknot, the eighth entry in S.E. Anderson’s slapstick sci-fi series, does just that. Oh, there’s humor. Plenty of it. Lots of absurd situations, cracking dialogue, and laugh-out-loud one-liners. There’s also action, intense set pieces of zap-or-be-zapped that feel right at home in this particular drama.

There’s also heart. For a series where so many of the characters are immortal, there’s a lot of heart. Then again, we’re eight books in, and if you aren’t emotionally invested in Sally and Zander and Blayde and all the rest by now…what are you doing?

But with that heart comes the gut-wrenching finale. See, while Anderson was making you laugh over the course of eight books, she was also tricking you into feeling for these characters. Not just as individuals, but the collective. The way they interact with each other, the way their relationships evolve from book to book — even from chapter to chapter.

And then, at the end, she rips the heart out.

Sci-fi being what it is (and this series being what it is), nothing is truly final. But in the moment, it feels like it. Victories are hollow, tainted with the sorrow of loss. This is one of the funnier books in the entire Starstruck saga, but it’s also the most emotionally resonant.

Then again, this book does have the word “dread” in the title.

Rating: *****

Dreadknot is available in paperback and Kindle

Book Birthday, Times Two

June 1 will forever be an important day for me as an author.

In fact, June 1 marks the birthday of two of my books — including my debut Bounty. The first entry in the Jill Andersen series went live on June 1, 2015. Exactly one year later, I launched Behind the Badge, the third book in the series.

Both book releases were largely without fanfare (I was woefully ignorant when Bounty went live, and to this day, Behind the Badge remains my worst-selling book), but still: a day in which I can celebrate the anniversary of two of my releases is a good day. Bounty proved I can do this, and Behind the Badge proved I can tell difficult, important stories.

Just don’t ask about Bounty‘s original cover. Because that will never see the light of day again.

There won’t be a new release on June 1 this year, but Bitter End is coming along nicely.

Bounty (Jill Andersen #1)
Jill Andersen is one of Baltimore’s best and brightest detectives, but she harbors a dark secret — a secret that threatens to come out when the body of Dr. Trent Roberts is pulled out of the Chesapeake Bay. Dr. Roberts’ connection to Jill reveals a past that involves a tour in Iraq, a secretive cybernetic experiment, and a conspiracy that involves a native son.

Can Jill solve the case while still keeping her secret? Will her partners at the Seventh Precinct find out what she’s so desperate to hide? What was Dr. Roberts looking into that led to his murder? And perhaps the biggest question of all…

Who is Bounty?

Behind the Badge (Jill Andersen #3)
For Jill Andersen, being part of the Baltimore Police Department has always been both a tremendous honor and a serious responsibility. Her father, before his fall from grace, had instilled in her a great respect for police and the work they do day-to-day. But when a teenage boy winds up dead on the outskirts of downtown Baltimore, Jill finds herself once again faced with those who would abuse their badges to fulfill personal agendas and uphold biases.

Jill still has a job to do, but she soon finds that not everyone is in her corner. For the first time in almost four years working Homicide, Jill finds herself at odds with people who claim to be on her side. From other cops to suits downtown all the way to the Mayor’s office, it becomes increasingly clear that Jill will need to rely on more than just her badge if she’s to solve this case.

But even if she finds justice, what’s the price?

Bounty and Behind the Badge are both available in paperback and all major ebook outlets.

About J.D. Cunegan
J.D. Cunegan is known for his unique writing style, a mixture of murder mystery and superhero epic that introduces the reader to his comic book-inspired storytelling and fast-paced prose. A 2006 graduate of Old Dominion University, Cunegan has an extensive background in journalism, a lengthy career in media relations, and a lifelong love for writing. Cunegan lives in Hampton, Virginia, and next to books and art, his big passion in life in auto racing. When not hunched in front of a keyboard or with his nose stuck in a book, Cunegan can probably be found at a race track or watching a race on TV.

Follow J.D. on FacebookTwitter, and Goodreads.

COVER REVEAL: Bitter End (Jill Andersen #6)

Here it is!

The cover to Bitter End (Jill Andersen #6), courtesy of the awesomesauce Sarah Anderson.

Book blurb and release date will be made available in the coming weeks.

About J.D. Cunegan
J.D. Cunegan is known for his unique writing style, a mixture of murder mystery and superhero epic that introduces the reader to his comic book-inspired storytelling and fast-paced prose. A 2006 graduate of Old Dominion University, Cunegan has an extensive background in journalism, a lengthy career in media relations, and a lifelong love for writing. Cunegan lives in Hampton, Virginia, and next to books and art, his big passion in life in auto racing. When not hunched in front of a keyboard or with his nose stuck in a book, Cunegan can probably be found at a race track or watching a race on TV.

Follow J.D. on FacebookTwitter, and Goodreads.

April 2022: Month in Review

An end-of-the-month look back at the last 30 days.

Another short post, because I have once again underestimated my own energy levels. Specifically, how I spend April recovering from March.

So, About Those Book Reviews…
They’re finally here!

In this installment, I review Echoes of Blood by Halo Scot, A Dangerous Game by Madeline Dyer, and Ace: What Asexuality Reveals About Desire, Society, and the Meaning of Sex by Angela Chen. I really enjoyed all three books for various reasons; read why here.

Speaking of Ace

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Remember?
That post I mentioned in the March month-in-review, that I had submitted to Writers’ Blokke on Medium and it was just sitting there? I submitted it to the ILLUMINATION page instead, and it posted! Check out The Theory of Creativity.

I Like Indie Books and I Cannot Lie
Since people like lists so much, I made one of my own: my favorite indie books.

Because indie books are cool. Indie authors are really cool, and the more we support them, the more really cool books these really cool people (full disclosure: myself included) will write.

Work, Work, Work…Day After Day…
Like most writers, I have a main source of income outside of my books. Yes, the dreaded “day job.” Does said day job actually help my writing, though?

It can. But not always.

It’s…complicated. Read why here.

I Was Told This Would Get Easier
Most things get easier the more often you do them. Writing? Not so much.

*Insert Stevie Wonder Singing Happy Birthday Here*
April 14 marked the two-year anniversary of Betrayal‘s release. That’s right, the fifth installment in the Jill Andersen series launched right as we were in the first throes of COVID-19. Worst timing ever aside, it was a successful launch.

Check out Betrayal here.

You Like Free Stuff, Don’t You?
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My Favorite Indie Books

With Indie April now upon us, what better time to re-visit this Medium post from February?

Anyone who’s followed me for any length of time knows I’m a strong supporter of self- and independently-published authors.

Not just because I’m self-published myself, but because so many of my favorite books over the past several years have come from indie authors. Fighting back against the stigma indie books face means shouting from the proverbial rooftops about the books we love, so consider this my bullhorn.

NOTE: Where appropriate, I use a slot for an entire series; that way, entries from that series don’t overwhelm the list.

The Judah Black series by E.A. Copen
(Guilty by AssociationBlood DebtChasing GhostsPlaying with Fire)
I’m a sucker for female protagonists, particularly those who are in jobs where one would traditionally expect to see a man. Enter Judah Black, federal investigator who specializes in the paranormal. Oh, and she’s a single mom. This is a police procedural with werewolves and other such creatures, but whatever you think you know about the genre, there’s more character depth than you might expect. The monsters and the lore are just a backdrop; the real story is Judah and how she balances being a single mother with forging a relationship and dealing with the realities of her job (and I don’t just mean the monsters). Copen is quite the prolific writer (I think she published two more books while I was typing this), and I hope she returns to this series one day.

Floor 21 (series) by Jason Luthor
(Floor 21Floor 21: DescentFloor 21: Judgement)
I’ll admit horror isn’t normally my cup of tea, but this post-apocalyptic first-person trilogy was certainly an exception. Told, at least in part, through a series of audio recordings in a building that’s long been abandoned, but not really, Floor 21 is every bit as intense as it is gruesome. The violence comes in short bursts, and the true horror is developed in the quiet moments, when you realize how the characters got to where they are and how, at least on the surface, everything seems so damn hopeless. It’s not the fear of the monsters right in front of you, it’s the ones lurking around in the dark, in the inaccessible lower floors. What you can’t see is far more dangerous than what you can, and this is a trio of books you’ll be reading with the light on.

Untamed (series) by Madeline Dyer
(UntamedFragmentedDividedDestroyed)
More intimate in scope than most other dystopian novels, Dyer’s Untamed series rightly shifts the focus from the macro storyline (end of the world, possible human conversion that erases all negative human emotion) and puts it instead on the small ragtag gang of characters facing seemingly impossible odds. The series gets darker and more intense with each passing installment, but the focus on Seven and those closest to her never wavers. Most authors would fall into the trap of world-building at the expense of everything else, but Dyer never does — and the result is a quartet of books that never grows stale, never slows down, never relents.

Starstruck (series) by S.E. Anderson
(StarstruckAlienationTravelerCelestialStarboundEarthstuckInalieableDreadknot)
I’ve made it known several times that I think sci-fi as a genre takes itself far too seriously. There’s a place for the grim and the apocalyptic, no doubt, but sometimes, sci-fi needs to be goofy. Laugh-out-loud funny. It’s possible to be intense and action-packed and still bring in the laughs. Enter Anderson’s Starstruck series (which, as of Feb. 22’s release of Dreadknot, is eight books deep). Very much in the vein of Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, this series gives us something different each book. One’s a murder mystery, another’s a time-hopping adventure, the next is a coming-of-age…Sally is very much out of her element in each installment, and the result is a slapstick and adventurous romp through the galaxy, one I think every sci-fi fan would do well to have on their shelf.

Dangerous Ways by R.R. Virdi
As vibrant and evocative and intense as many of the dimensions its characters inhabit, Dangerous Ways does for high fantasy what Virdi’s Grave Report series does for street-level thrillers. Virdi writes with a free-flowing, quick-witted first-person style that makes the pages fly by, so a book as large as Dangerous Ways doesn’t feel all that large. It’s not just a fantastic exercise in world-building, it’s also the perfect example of how vibrant, memorable characters can elevate a narrative. Mainstays Hawthorne and Cassidy are a delight on their own, but the supporting cast they encounter through several different worlds makes this book feel like a world all its own.

Aix Marks the Spot by S.E. Anderson
One author claims two spots on this list, and Aix Marks the Spot is every bit as worthy of its inclusion — even if it’s night and day from Anderson’s flagship series. This book is emotional and charming and funny and heartfelt in ways big and small. This is mostly a light read, a love letter to Provence, France, but there is a dark undercurrent throughout — one that in the hands of a less capable author could come across as forced or unnecessary. Anderson is at her best here, weaving a personal tale with luminary prose. The coming-of-age story isn’t my first choice — unless there’s superheroes or magic involved — but Aix Marks the Spot is the exception, and it’s one of the more surprisingly emotional books I’ve read.

A Country of Eternal Light by Darby Harn
This book is a masterpiece. It’s crushing and deflating and grim and it will gut you seemingly every other chapter — but it’s also the perfect encapsulation of the stubbornness of the human condition, and you’ll find yourself unable to put the book down. A Country of Eternal Light is spec fic that doesn’t feel like spec fic. It feels more like an exhaustive, raw study of the human condition — constantly asking the question “Why?” Why do humans keep pushing forward, even when things seem completely hopeless? Why keep going when there’s no longer any point? Harn’s focus on the people, not the disaster, makes for a book that’s impossible to put down.

Edge of the Breach by Halo Scot
A gripping, disturbing read that is as enthralling as it is uncomfortable, Scot’s series debut follows Rune and Kyder, who are more or less opposite sides of the same coin in a post-apocalyptic world where freedom and power are often illusions. It’s dystopian spec fic that focuses on the two protagonists and their relationships (…such that they are, in Kyder’s case), and Scot showcases a deft pen while taking us along on a tale of violence, debauchery, heartbreak, rage, and pushing forward no matter how bleak things get. Because things are bleak. But Scot is a capable enough writer to not only handle it, but make it impossible to turn away. There are three other entries in the series (and on my TBR), and I don’t see how they won’t be every bit as engrossing (or just gross) as the original.

March 2022: Month in Review

An end-of-the-month look back at the last 30 days.

This might be a short post, because March is, by far, my day job’s busiest month. And I always overestimate my ability to do book stuff while also juggling the madness.

The only dance I know how to do.

Where’s the Beef?
No book reviews this month, because with the aforementioned March Being A Thing, I didn’t finish any of the books I’m reading. But I am in the process of reading Echoes of Blood by Halo Scot, Dreadknot by S.E. Anderson, and A Dangerous Game by Madeline Dyer. All are potential five-star reads.

End of an Era?
Don’t tell 20-year-old me, but I am giving serious thought to giving up video games and selling off my collection. I barely play anymore, and the industry has devolved to the point where none of the new machines or games interest me (even games like Gran Turismo 7, and I’m a lifelong GT junkie!). Spare time is precious to me anymore, and I find myself devoting less and less of it to gaming (and when I do game, it’s almost always the older stuff).

Ad Time
I tried another Facebook ad for Notna in March, since Facebook gifted me a $50 credit for a boosted post. I tried the same post I did back in January, but this time, I changed the Buffy comparison to Supernatural (to test my theory) and ran the ad for nearly two weeks (March 6-21), targeted a strictly US audience, and added target filters to include fans of adventure fiction, fantasy books, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Supernatural.

In all, I reached 4,135 people and got 60 clicks (both increases over the first Facebook ad). The mobile app news feed and suggested videos feed gave me the bulk of my clicks, and almost 70% of my reach was men (…why, I have no idea). Texas and California were the states where I had the most reach, and the effect on sales was…negligible.

So, it’s looking like, while Facebook ads are great for getting eyeballs on my FB page, it doesn’t really do much sales-wise.

Your Mileage May Vary
Are books on writing worth the paper on which they’re printed? For the most part, I say no. Feel free to agree. Or disagree. But don’t use any adverbs, or Stephen King will come after you.

Where Are the Haters?
I was convinced this article would lose me followers, but it seems to have just been…largely ignored. On Medium, I wrote about why I write about the police in the midst of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Yes, There’s a Difference
I recently wrote about the difference between inspiration and motivation. Yes, those are two completely different things, and they are often mutually exclusive from one another. It’s one of the more maddening aspects of being an author.

Is This Thing On?
I had written another essay for Medium, one where I examine creativity in a theoretical sense, and submitted it to the Writers’ Blokke publication. But…it’s still there. I know they’ve said they’re swamped with content over there, but this is by far the longest it’s taken one of my essays to get posted. Shame, too, because I was really proud of this one.

From the ‘Out of Your Comfort Zone’ Department:
I’ve written a children’s book. You can’t buy it, but you can read about what I learned through the experience.

You Like Free Stuff, Don’t You?
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No?

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